HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM

 

Dear KPR Community,

As the new school year approaches, I wanted to take a moment to update parents, guardians and our community on the Health and Physical Education Curriculum for the coming school year.

As you know, the government has announced a broad public consultation on this issue.

While this consultation is underway, the Ministry of Education has re-issued the 2010 Health and Physical Education Curriculum for elementary students. Secondary students will continue to receive the curriculum broadly revised and introduced in 2015.

As we review the interim curriculum we want to assure the communities we serve of our unwavering commitment to welcoming and responsive school environments for all, including LGBTQ+ students, families, and staff, as part of our core values of equity and inclusive education.

We know that our teachers and school support staff are well-trained professionals who will continue to be committed to supporting the well-being and healthy development of students. As an organization we will continue to promote diversity and lived experiences in our classrooms, celebrate our differences, and embrace events and activities that promote acceptance, safety and a sense of belonging.

We are obligated by legislation, however, to follow the provincially approved curriculum.  Our elementary education staff will teach the 2010 Health and Physical Education Curriculum (Grades 1-8) and our secondary teachers will continue to teach the 2015 Health and Physical Education Curriculum.

We would not advocate or suggest they take any other course of action.

While the wording may be different than the 2015 curriculum, the 2010 curriculum still contains many critically important topics. In some cases, these topics are now covered under “prompts” as opposed to “expectations,” but they remain in the curriculum.

In addition to the area of health and physical education, we will continue to be guided by our policies relating to equity and safe schools. As a result, we feel there is ample opportunity across subject areas to provide for meaningful conversations that promote safety, inclusion and belonging in classrooms, as well as review areas such as safe schools and online safety practices.

We will share any further direction from the Ministry of Education when available, and continue our ongoing focus on equity and maintaining inclusive, welcoming environments for all students. Please review the Question and Answers below for further information.

Sincerely,

Dr. Jennifer Leclerc
Director of Education

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM AUGUST 2018

 

Q.  What Health and Physical Education Curriculum will be taught in September?

A.   The provincial government has re-issued the 2010 Health and Physical Education Curriculum for elementary students. 

 

Q.   Has the curriculum changed in secondary schools?

A.   No. The secondary school Health and Physical education curriculum will continue to be the one revised and introduced in 2015.

 

Q.   Do teachers have to use the older curriculum?

A.   Yes. The Ministry of Education develops the curriculum to be used by all school boards in the province. We are obligated by legislation to follow the approved curriculum and we would not advocate or suggest our teachers take any other course of action.

Our teachers are also highly professional, and will teach the curriculum in a developmentally and age-appropriate manner as they have always done. We will always be committed to our moral obligation to create learning spaces that are safe, inclusive and focused on student success and well-being.

 

Q.   How is the older curriculum different from the one introduced in 2015?

A.   Over the next few weeks we will be reviewing the revised curriculum to better understand what is in it, what is not, what is covered and when.

While the wording may be different than the 2015 curriculum, the 2010 curriculum still contains many critically important topics. In some cases, these topics are now covered under “prompts” as opposed to “expectations,” but they remain in the curriculum.

In addition to the area of health and physical education, we will continue to be guided by our policies relating to equity and safe schools.

As a result, we feel there is ample opportunity across subject areas to provide for meaningful conversations that promote safety, inclusion and belonging in classrooms, as well as review areas such as safe schools and online safety practices.

Here are some examples:

Mental health, body image, substance abuse, violence, harassment, child abuse, gender identity, sexual orientation, illness (including HIV/AIDS), and poverty will continue to be discussed within an open, caring, sensitive way and in an atmosphere of mutual respect. (p.30)

Teachers can also have a decisive influence on students by … taking advantage of “teachable moments” to address immediate relationship issues that may arise among students. The study of healthy relationships, particularly with respect to bullying/harassment and violence prevention, should include a focus on sexist, racist, and homophobic behaviour. (p.30)

All students must be made aware of issues of privacy, safety, and responsible use, as well as of the potential for abuse of technology, particularly when it is used to promote hatred. (p.64)

Students should be taught to apply living skills (e.g. decision–making, assertiveness, and refusal skills) in making informed decisions and analysing the consequences of engaging in sexual activities and using drugs. (p.201)

 

Q.  What if I have a question about what my child is learning in their classroom? 

A.   The best place to start for parents if they have a question about anything related to their child’s learning, is with their classroom teacher. These conversations can strengthen positive relationships between parents and teachers, and resolve concerns at the level closest to the issue. Parents are also always free to discuss any issue related to their child’s education with the school Principal.